Segregated via Socialization

I’m currently waiting to enter my next class. In front of me, a door opens to another lecture hall, all full of males. It’s probably some higher level math or science course. Males have made it so that they dominate those fields, meanwhile discouriging women from wanting pursue such areas of education.

I’m a pre-nursing major (for now). And there is only a handful of males in the corresponding chemistry course for aspiring nursing majors. My biology class is mostly female, and so was algebra last semester.

Not often, or ever, do I hear of a female engineer or chemist. Female game developers are far and few between, and also discriminated against.

Women and girls are purposefully underestimated. Have been for centuries (millenia, if you count how long the patriarchy has been in place). We are socialized to be seen as inferior, to be inferior. And that is reflected in schools everywhere. If it’s not traditionally seen as woman’s work, then women don’t participate often. But there are men in just about every career and sport.

I am debating between becoming a nurse-midwife or a nurse-anesthetist. One assists women during pregnancy and childbirth (and has such a long, brave history) and the other is career in which I assist people before and after major surgeries, dental care, etc. Both pay well (and yes, money matters to me, living in this world) but I don’t know which will be the job I can wake up to every morning and be happy.

Going into actual, full-fledged adulthood, I just want to be happy, or more so content. Ever since I found radical feminism, I walk around with a critical eye and proceed with caution. I can’t unsee what I’ve learned to spot out. And with midwifery, practically a female-specific career, I will be actively helping females go through something that is specific to our bodies, and ours alone. No medical interventions, no sterile hospital room, no morgue six stories below the labor and ‘delivery’ floor (qouted because you can’t really deliver someone else’s baby, I don’t believe). I actually hate hospitals for childbrith. A place where people suffer, and oftentimes do not get better, is not the place to welcome life.

But I digress. I saw a room full of dudes and felt some type of way (see: frustrated). Made me want to blog.

Please excuse any typos.

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9 responses to “Segregated via Socialization

  1. Hey, I haven’t entered the college world but I am a radical feminist artist who is planning to major in biology and the stem fields, hopefully neuroscience next year.
    My main peeve about college is going to be male dominated classes, and just male staff. Do you still feel that conforming to femininity grants women around you greater mobility?
    Do you feel great pressure to be a “lady” in college?
    What is your biggest issue as radical feminist?

      • Okay, I might have just answered this, but the biggest issue is feeling like no one else sees what I see. And just being around a bunch of men is unnerving until you start ignoring them.

    • I kind of do feel pushed to be a ‘lady’ outside of and inside of my dorm. Everywhere I go, there are males at least somewhere near by, so I feel the need to be “presentable”. Like I feel odd leaving out without some type of jewelry on, hair decent, etc. (But makeup is where I draw the line, though some females wear a full face of it everyday.)

      Just walking around, I ( as a radfem) can spot the efforts to conform to feminimity under the male gaze. And the two reports of rape and sexual assualt on campus this school year were…very angering, frustrating, disturbing.

      About feminimity granting mobility, I think it kind of does, but at the same time there will always be that underlying feeling that you are not being taken seriously. All these arrogant men around campus happily look over the females who pretty much aren’t skinny, fair-skinned, and wearing revealing clothing.

      For the most part, I go under the radar and I am enjoying myself. I have made a friends with a few females who I hang with all the time, and it’s great. Once you find a group of friends, you feel less like an outsider. But that feeling never goes away completely. I try to voice a little feminism to my friends, but they are mainfully oblivious to our cause. Hopefully, I can get find a fellow radfem somewhere lol

      It’s kind of hard to explain, because I go around being basically, and totally, ignored. I wear obviously female clothing, but the fact doesn’t change when I just where whatever. It could be just me though. I was rather invisible in high school too.

      But overall, it becomes very easy to ignore the men right back. They are a non-factor to my social life and education. (Srry if this comment is all over the place. My brain is fried.)

      • I know exactly what you mean and the same thing happens to me. Men naturally predate after the women who looks subordinated because that sexually excites them. But don’t think they aren’t paying attention to the “ugly” girls, because they seek and expect sexual service from all women.
        I go to a small highschool and I get along with the males alright as long as I don’t step on their dicks. I navigate and deal with them, but I don’t like and or enjoy them. Each interaction is so unreciprocal, and other attention is purely sexual.
        I plan to stay under the radar in college. But thanks for responding!
        Radical Feminist women are highly different than other people, so naturally your isolation can be explained by this. For me, women who are totally oblivious to radical feminism gravitate towards me. So I have a cuckold of friends that appreciate me because I am the good friend. But otherwise I walk around the world like I don’t give a fuck.

      • Yeah, I deal with males just fine. But only in small doses. I have always had only female friends, and despite my firm beliefs, I’m almost too nice sometimes. Any guys who have talked to me have either wanted me sexually or just to help them with their class work, or something. I’ve only had one actual guy friend, and we don’t talk anymore (which just shows that I was the one putting in all effort into maintaing the friendship, as he has never even tried to contact me since graduation.)

        I think they can sometimes sense the gaurds a woman puts up around them. The smart ones just shutup if I don’t give them any time of my day 😉

        Oh, and aren’t you African-American as well (I hate to assume, but I think you said you were)? There are mainly white males on campus, so if they don’t have a thing for black girls, then they usually just steer clear and ignore us.

      • My school is integrated, so often it seems like male exploitation and objectification exceeds race, which is true. Some guys have their fetishes or preferences. While others are so horny they don’t care. It’s really disgusting because i get touched and winked at randomly by men and It confuses me because I’m a lesbian and I dress like punk rock/ goth lesbian and I don’t even try.
        I am of the african american ethnic group on my fathers side, but my mother is of mixed origins ( possibly german, indigenous american, african), not sure because of familial distance/rape. But yes I am obvs woman of color, and experience daily sexual harassment and objectification from all males.
        The men at your school probably don’t want to date you, but would fuck you just because your skin symbolizes promiscuity/easy pussy to them. Which is creepy as fuck. I’m so careless to their preferences since I don’t date men. I only deal with them professionally.

      • A man will fuck just about anything he think he can conquer. I’m painfully aware of that. It’s mainly my avoidance of all males on campus (regardless of race) that prohibits them from ever approaching me. Its quite diverse here, as was my high school, and my group of friends is diverse. But here in NC, you don’t see white guys going after non-white girls often. They do that shit on the down low. Which makes sense to all men. Black women are at the bottom.

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